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Rachel Goodman's picture

New Study Shows Organic Crops Contain More Anti-oxidants/Fewer Pesticides

Consumers choose organic foods for many reasons- for example, because the food is produced in a way that is better for the environment. Now, a new comprehensive review of previous studies shows mounting evidence organic crops may also contain more anti-oxidants and fewer pesticide residues.  In a new study published today in the British Journal of Nutrition researchers at Newcastle University in England have found that organic crops overall contain 17% more key anti-oxidants than non-organically grown crops, while some classes of anti-oxidants known as flavinones, were found at a rate 69% higher. Anti-oxidants are components in fighting cancer and are thought to play a key role in preventing heart disease and neurodegenerative disease

Karen Adler's picture

Compost Could Save (Plant) Lives

Each year organic farmers lose time and money when crops are destroyed by diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens that live on the surfaces of seeds. Many of the fumigants and chemically treated seeds that are used in conventional agriculture to control these pathogens can be harmful to our health and the health of the environment. Organic farmers have fewer and often less effective options. Enter the humble but mighty soil amendment, compost, which harbors billions of secret (microbial) weapons against plant disease. New research funded by OFRF is exploring a promising application to harness these weapons to produce a new tool for disease prevention for organic farmers.

OFRF Research Grant Helps Breeders Develop Sweeter Organic-Friendly Corn

Press Release
 
For immediate release: June 5, 2014
 
Contact:
Brise Tencer, Executive Director: (831) 426-6606  brise@ofrf.org
Rachel Goodman, Communications Consultant: (831) 457-8098  rachel@ofrf.org
 
OFRF Research Grant Helps Breeders Develop Sweeter Organic-Friendly Corn
 
Karen Adler's picture

Putting the “Sweet” in Organic Sweet Corn!

      What could be better than that burst of sugary goodness as you crunch into the first ear of summer corn? One reason we look forward to this is that corn has actually gotten sweeter over the years thanks to the hard work of plant breeders. There is a downside, however. These newer varieties, featuring the flavor we have come to expect, were not developed for conditions on organic farms, as they are reliant on fungicides and pesticides, and utilize soluble synthetic fertilizers in large quantities.

     In addition, very little sweet corn grown commercially today is open pollinated (op). This means that organic farmers who wish to save their own seed have few, if any, good choices of varieties to grow.                   

Brise Tencer's picture

OFRF at the May OTA Policy Conference, Washington DC

Recently, I attended the Organic Trade Association’s (OTA) Policy Conference in my new role as OFRF’s Executive Director. The conference brought together many organic industry leaders who heard from Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), Chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee. A significant number of farmers also attended as part of the newly formed OTA Farmers Advisory Council.

The National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) is pleased to announce the release of the FY 2014 RFA for the Crop Protection and Pest Management program.

The purpose of the Crop Protection and Pest Management program addresses high priority issues related to pests and their management using IPM approaches at the state, regional and national levels. The CPPM program supports projects that will increase food security and respond effectively to other major societal challenges with comprehensive IPM approaches that are economically viable, environmentally sound and will help protect human health.

Organic Farming Research Foundation Hires New Executive Director

Press Release

Organic Farming Research Foundation Hires New Executive Director

For immediate release: May 6, 2014
Contact: Rachel Anne Goodman
Rachel@ofrf.org
(831) 426-6606 

(Santa Cruz, CA) The board of directors of the Organic Farming Research Foundation (OFRF) is pleased to announce the hiring of Brise Tencer as executive director effective May 1. Since 1990, OFRF has funded over $3,000,000 in organic research projects and acted as a strong advocate for organic policy and education. 
Mark Keating's picture

Texas Two-Step: Organic Standards Board Meeting One to Watch

The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) will convene in San Antonio, Texas this week for its first meeting in more than a year.  Authorized by the Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA) of 1990, the NOSB’s origins make for a fascinating chapter in the history of the organic movement.  While the beginning of the story is well worth knowing, it’s the NOSB’s ongoing responsibility for establishing organic standards that will make this week’s meeting especially important.

Karen Adler's picture

Putting the Earth Back in Earth Day

“Essentially, all life depends upon the soil... There can be no life without soil and no soil without life; they have evolved together.” --Charles E. Kellogg /USDA Yearbook of Agriculture, 1938

How often do you think about the earth beneath your feet?

If you are a farmer or soil scientist, it’s many times a day. Otherwise, probably not very often, since our soil is something that most of us take for granted. But did you know that half of our topsoil has been lost in the last 150 years, and we’re now losing it at rates 10 to 40 times faster than it can naturally be replenished? Currently, 40% of the soil used for agriculture throughout the world is classified as degraded or seriously degraded.

Mark Keating's picture

Where Will Vermont’s GMO-labeling Bill Leave the Organic Brand?

     Proposals to require labeling of food products containing GMO ingredients are sprouting up in state legislatures and public referendums across the country. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, there are GMO labeling bills currently under consideration in 29 states and after years of stalemate, the tide may be turning in their favor.  While mandatory GMO labeling would be a milestone affirmation of our right to know where our food comes from, it also has genuine limitations when measured against organic certification.

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