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Using High-residue Cover Crop Mulch for Weed Management In Organic No-till Potato Production Systems

The overall goals of this project are to (1) optimize potato yield without using chemical herbicides or fertilizers, and (2) disseminate the knowledge and results generated from this study to farmers and agricultural professionals throughout the United States.

Eff ectiveness and economic impact of weed control systems in organic garlic production

Project objectives were:

a) To determine which weed reduction system is the most economically effective by:

1) Determining total labor and material cost for each weed control system.

2) Determining effectiveness of each weed control system by recording percent weed species emergence and percent weed cover throughout the year.

3) Determining total garlic yield for each weeding system.

4) Determining garlic quality, as measured by bulb size, for each weeding system.

Natural Products for Control of Parasitic Honey Bee Mites

Objective Statement:

Objectives were: 1. to provide beekeepers with safe, effective, reliable and affordable alternatives to Apistan and Coumaphos for control of parasitic mites. Currently, these chemicals must be applied twice each year to ensure colony survival, and that is often insufficient. I will investigate alternative strategies that either reduce the use of synthetic pesticides by ½ or that eliminate them all together.

Using Pediobius foveolatus as a biological control agent for Mexican bean beetle in snap beans

Objectives

1) Test two options for reducing damage from Mexican bean beetle in the first year of release: a) Raise the release rate of wasps, and b) Apply one spray of a botanical insecticide to reduce the initial density of adult beetles, then release the wasps at the usual rate after the spray residue is gone and when remaining beetles are in the appropriate larval stage. 

Bat Houses for Integrated Pest Management-- Benefits for Bats and Organic Farmers: Phase I

The first objective of this study (Phase I) was to establish four bat houses (two pairs each of a proven nursery design) at 10 organic farms in California and Utah. Larger, experimental designs were to be installed at five of these sites for testing purposes. Data from the North American Bat House Research Project shows that pairs or groups of houses are more successful than single houses.

Investigations into the Ecology of Microtheca ochroloma and control methods for organic farmers

Objectives The original objectives of the project were as follows: 1. To determine if beetles remain active into summer if crucifers are present under field conditions. 2. To determine if initial infestation of M. ochroloma arise from within the field from the soil subsurface or whether beetle enter the field from field edges after oversummering. 3. To determine whether intercropping crucifers protects them from YMLB by hiding them among non-host plants. 4. To determine if cutting crucifers makes them easier for the beetles to find, therefore increasing infestation. 

Integrated caterpillar control in organic sweet corn Year 1, 2, 3

The purpose of this project is to work with a group of diversified vegetable farmers in the Northeast to evaluate an integrated non-chemical strategy for managing key caterpillar pests in sweet corn. In New England, corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) migrates annually into the region and causes serious ear damage in late-season corn. European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) is a resident pest of sweet corn which also contributes to ear damage, especially in the later part of the season.

Intercropping to Create Local Refugia for Natural Enemies of Arthropod Pests: Flowers and Birds in Organic Agroecosystems

Farmer surveys conducted during the first year of a multi-year research program investigating the diversity and utilization of North-central Florida farmlands by birds demonstrated a great interest by organic producers in the potential impact birds have on insect populations in their cropping systems (Jacobson at al. 2003). They expressed interest in management recommendations designed to enhance the presence and foraging activities of insectivorous birds on their farms. Therefore based upon this interest we developed the following objectives for this study:

Evaluation of Glandular-Haired, Potato Leafhopper Resistant Alfalfa for Organic Farming Systems

Objectives

The primary objective of this proposal was to determine the ability to produce organically grown alfalfa in areas with significant potato leaf hopper pressure and then to share this capability with organic growers. Specific experimental objectives were:

1. Determine if glandular-haired, PLH resistant alfalfa can be produced organically,

2. Determine if organically grown glandular-haired, PLH resistant alfalfa can reduce PLH density,

Prioritizing research, education and regulatory pest management needs of organic potato farmers through participatory strategic planning

USDA funding of organic farming research and outreach is disproportionate compared to the amount of U.S. certified organic land. According to Organic Farming Research Foundation’s State of the States 2nd Edition, 0.3 – 2% of U.S. farmland is certified organic, but only 0.06% of land grant research acres is certified organic. This project addressed the disparity of organic research and Organic Farming Research Foundation’s goal of obtaining a fair share of research funding for organic foods and farming.

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