Mark Keating's picture

What A Long Strange Trip It’s Been!

It’s not too often that we discover a new masterpiece by Georgia O’Keeffe, or even an unknown soundboard recording of our favorite musicians.  Reading the journal article “Organic Agriculture in the United States: A 30 Year Retrospective” induced a similarly revelatory and exhilarating experience for me.  Co-authored by Dr. Garth Youngberg and Suzanne DeMuth, the article itself is new, yet it speaks authoritatively and insightfully about the genesis of the organic movement in America and brings into remarkable focus what we have achieved since then.

Maureen Wilmot's picture

Live Long & Prosper… Organically

As I wait to see how Congress will set the future food and farming policies for this country, my attention shifts to the other side of the country where more than 130,000 people were focused on the future of the worlds. Which worlds? I’m not entirely sure.

Karen Adler's picture

Reducing Dead Zone through Organic Practices

The concept of Organic Agriculture moves center stage in the global sustainability debate.
--One Earth, One Future: 2012 Consolidated Annual Report of the IFOAM (Integrated Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements) Action Group.

map of the dead zoneDid you hear that the area in the Gulf of Mexico known as the dead zone is soon expected to reach the size of New Jersey?  Due to heavy spring flooding in the Midwest, with a lot more nitrogen-based fertilizer ending up in the Gulf, this year’s dead zone could be the biggest on record. And there are, unfortunately, many other areas in the U.S. and around the world with dead zones created by unsustainable practices.  Dead zone is a term commonly used to describe the results of hypoxia. This dramatic impact of chemical-based agriculture on biodiversity and the environment occurs when agricultural nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, leach into waterways and wash downstream, accumulating in the waters of an estuary or bay. The decomposition process depletes the oxygen. Marine life flees or dies when oxygen levels get too low for their survival. Bird and animal populations that feed on marine life also shrink as their food sources disappear.

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