Karen Adler's picture

Knowledge is Power: The Natural Farmer Shares Its Bounty

A wealth of practical organic farming information has been gathered over the years by farmers and researchers all over the country, and is shared through a variety of methods. One storehouse of knowledge is The Natural Farmer (TNF), which is the quarterly journal of the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA), a 5,000-strong membership organization with chapters in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Vermont, and New Hampshire.

photo of Jack KittredgeThe Natural Farmer, edited since 1988 by Jack Kittredge, a Massachusetts organic farmer, has published hundreds of useful articles since 1988, with each issue focused on specific production and marketing topics ranging from crops such as cucurbits, potatoes, and minor fruit, to explorations of climate change, internet marketing, and manure. And now, with the support of a grant from Organic Farming Research Foundation, 101 of these articles, from twelve issues, are available in a searchable archive by topic and key phrases, such as “organic potatoes,” or “forages for swine.”

Mark Keating's picture

House Farm Bill is Resoundingly Defeated

The journey towards a new Farm Bill took another detour last Thursday when the U.S. House of Representatives rejected by a vote of 234 to 195 the proposal which Republican leadership brought to the floor.

Multiple factors contributed to this outcome: Democrats overwhelmingly voted against the bill which included onerous changes to federal nutrition assistance programs and many Republicans who wanted to see more reform and savings from the commodity programs joined them. The House Agriculture Committee acknowledged when submitting this bill that they had a narrow pathway to passage and in the end, they could not attract enough support to get there.

Karen Adler's picture

More Buzz on Pollinators

In celebration of National Pollinator Week, we are following last week’s post with some great buzz on native bees, courtesy of our friends at The Xerces Society and the Wild Farm Alliance.

While we love European honey bees, and promote practices to ensure their survival and safety, they are, as the name says, not native to North America. Many crops are dependent on honey bees for pollination, but native bees are often better adapted to various climatic conditions than honey bees. Also, some native bees can be more efficient pollinators than honey bees for native American crops such as tomatoes, squash, pumpkins, cranberries, and blueberries, as well as many old world orchard crops, such as apples and cherries.

Fast facts on native pollinators:

  • Native bees are more effective than honey bees at distributing pollen.
  • Native bees get to work earlier in the day and put in longer hours.
  • Many native bees are more active in colder and wetter weather: mason and bumble bees fly at lower temperatures than honey bees and work in the rain.

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