Mark Keating's picture

What’s more essential than eating?

One unfortunate misperception helping to sustain the current government shutdown is the assumption that since all “essential” federal employees remain on the job, Washington can meet its “essential” responsibilities. A closer look at USDA’s current capabilities reveals that nothing could be further from the truth and that the shutdown is inflicting immediate and lasting damage.

According to the Rural Advancement Foundation International, 1,423 farmers are waiting for Congress to pass a budget so that they can receive USDA direct farm operating loans that have already been approved for 2013. An additional 2,161 families have deferred their dream of farm ownership as they wait for funding of approved direct farm ownership loans, and an additional 1,005 are waiting on guaranteed ownership loans. No progress can be made on these loans until Congress funds the return of the “non-essential” USDA staffers to complete the paperwork.

Mark Keating's picture

Prospects for a New Farm Bill

 

Paul McCartney wasn’t thinking about renewing the Farm Bill when he penned The Long and Winding Road  yet his masterpiece aptly describes this ongoing process.  The latest hairpin turn came last Friday when the House of Representatives passed a bill for a stand-alone Nutrition Title which cuts $39 billion from domestic food assistance programs over the next decade.  Having passed the balance of the Farm Bill back in July the House now has a complete package which opens the door to a compromise with the Senate on its version.

Mark Keating's picture

Strength through Unity

This week I represented OFRF at the summer meeting of the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition alongside beautiful beaches on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan.  The meeting also marked NSAC’s twenty-fifth anniversary and the changes our movement has experienced over that time point very favorably towards our future.

In certain regards, the times seem not to have changed at all.  The organization that grew into NSAC was founded during a crisis for America’s family farmers, when government incentives to plant fence row to fence row led to skyrocketing land prices and relegated resource conservation to an afterthought.  These conditions are all too representative of American agriculture today.

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