Organic Farmers

Bat Houses for Integrated Pest Management-- Benefits for Bats and Organic Farmers: Phase I

Bats are helpful to farmers, as they consume large quantities of insect pests, but many bat species are declining due to loss of roost sites. Farmers can help bats by providing new roosts in the form of bat houses while at the same time benefiting from batsí pest reduction services. However, as much of the evidence for batsí roles in insect biocontrol is anecdotal, further studies are needed to better document batsí contributions to agriculture.

Conserving and restoring pollination services in organic farms of Yolo and Solano Counties, Northern California

Native bee pollinators link natural habitats with agricultural areas. Native bee populations may rely on natural habitats to provide forage and nesting resources during part of the year, and agricultural areas the rest of the year. Native bee pollinators may provide pollination services in both areas, and may in turn depend on both. Thus problems in one area could affect the other.

Increasing Organic Farmer Access to Relevant and Practical Research-Based Information

The principal objective of this project was to make a greater proportion of relevant and practical research-based information available to organic farmers. Experienced organic farmers were specifically targeted. In the original proposal, NCAT planned to create a quarterly publication featuring abstracts of relevant research gleaned from the literature. Emphasis was to be placed on recent, cutting-edge research on a broad range of topics pertinent to organic production and marketing.

Alternative Methods of Raspberry Production and Root Rot Control

Root rot (Phytopthora fragriae var. rubi) is of primary concern to all raspberry growers in Washington, and is of particular concern to organic growers who have fewer options for disease control. This trial is focused on organic root rot control, however all raspberry growers will benefit from new disease management strategies.

Efficacy of Homeopathic Preparations of Augotenous Mastitis Causing Organism in Prevention of Mastitis in Cattle

The original proposal included two experiments:

1) a double blind on two farms (the Nova Scotia Agricultural College dairy herd and Herman Mentink's herd);

2) a testing of the homeopathic preparation vs antibiotic in three commercial dairy herds, Banks', Jackson's and DeNuke's.

Biological control of Delia sp. in cole crops with rove beetles, Aleochara sp. Part1)

The consumer demand for organic produce is increasing. In order for growers to be able to meet this demand, effective non-chemical tools need to be available for pest management. In BC in particular there is an increase in the production of organic cole crops, hence an urgent need to develop organic integrated pest management (IPM) systems that emphasize biological, cultural and other non-chemical methods (for insect and disease management).

Biological control of Delia sp. in cole crops with rove beetles, Aleochara sp. (Part 2)

The objective of this study was to examine the use of rove beetles, Aleochara spp., for the biological control of root maggots, Delia spp. in organic cole crops. We were interested in manipulating Aleochara numbers by either conservation strategies or by augmentative releases of mass-reared Aleochara bilineata. 

Impact of Disease Suppressive Composts on Organic Vegetable Quality Composition and Yield

The goal of this research was to initiate studies on compost effects on severity of common soil borne diseases and to characterize changes plant growth due to improved nutrient availability and soil microbial activity with compost application in organic production systems. 

Project Objectives

-Analyze several animal manure-based, organic-approved compost products for suppression of important soil-borne pathogens of vegetable crops in the Northeast

-Determine applicability of a farmer-based test kit for assessment of compost maturity to predict suppressiveness

Soil Nutrient Balancing in Sustainable Vegetable Production

The purpose of this project is to determine whether an unfavorable balance among soil 

A comparison of antibiotic susceptibility patterns for Staphylococcus aureus in organic and conventional dairy herds

Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry with annual losses in the United States exceeding $2 billion (Philpot, 1984). Losses stem from milk discard, drug costs, veterinary care, increased labor, and premature- culling. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens causing intramammary infections in dairy cattle (Gonzalez et al.,1988) and continues to be one of the major causes of mastitis in dairy herds worldwide (Barkema et al. 1998, Gonzalez et al. 1988, Nickerson et al. 1999, Osteras et al. 1999, Sol et al.

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