Breeding

Snap Beans with Enhanced Nitrogen-Use Efficiency for Organic Production-Year 2

Snap beans with enhanced nitrogen-use efficiency
for organic production-Year 2

Can Organic Garlic Seed Stock Be Created Disease-free from the Production of Garlic Bulbils?

Can Organic Garlic Seed Stock Be Created Disease-Free From the Production of Garlic Bulbils?

Serious diseases of garlic have been imported from foreign sources and are now widespread within the US and Canada. Stem and Bulb Nematode (Ditylenchus dipsaci) in garlic seed (vegetative reproduction) will infest the soil and is impossible to eradicate using organic approved methods. It is a threat to other crops, including onions, potatoes, alfalfa, and strawberries. Infested land is substantially reduced in value, as the nematode may be transferred on equipment.

Organic Seed Production and Improvement Training Program for Vermont

There is an ever-increasing need for sources of organic seed and an interest by farmers and seed companies to build a local and regional supply of seed. This project addresses that need, and builds on a collaborative project conducted by Northeast Organic Farming Association-Vermont (NOFA-VT) and High Mowing Organic Seeds (HMOS) from 2002 to 2005, called the Organic Seed Production Technical Assistance Program.

Snap Beans With Enhanced Nitrogen-Use Efficiency for Organic Production -Year 1

The snap bean is a vegetable in the Fabaceae family and does have the capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through a symbiotic relationship with Rhizobium spp. Historically, easy access to nitrate-based soil amendments at a relatively low cost has precluded the need to develop cultivars with improved nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE). Excessive fertilizer applications containing 40 to over 100 lbs. of N / acre have resulted in leaching and the contamination of ground and surface water.

Create Two Open-Pollinated, Sugary Enhanced Sweet Corn Varieties - Year III

Very little sweet corn grown commercially today is open pollinated. Farmers who wish to save their own seed have few if any good choices of varieties to grow. Today’s hybrids have been developed for conditions that are different from those found on most organic farms. Organic sweet corn growers deserve better choices.

Effect of Compost Extracts on Organic Seed Germination and Reduction of Weed Seed Expression

Organic growers consider weeds their number one problem in crop production. Organic growers whether they grow vegetables, grains, herbs, berries, or native plants are constantly on the lookout for finding new technology that reduce severity of weed problems and yield losses. One method is to assess whether the use of compost extract would lead to weed seed suppression for better crop seed emergence.

Participatory Screening of Broccoli Varieties for Organic Systems in Western North Carolina

Identifying appropriate varieties for organic production in the mountains of Western North Carolina is considered a research priority by local growers.

Developing "Organic-Ready" Maize Populations with Gametophytic Incompatibility Year III

The purpose of this five-year breeding project is to reduce transgenic contamination of organic maize grown in the USA by maintaining the integrity of organic maize seed.  Organic farmers are not required to produce transgene-free crops, but they must plant seed that is free of transgene.  An important objective of this project is the education of seed producers and organic farmers on how to use these “Organic-Ready” varieties for reducing the incidence of transgenic contamination. 

Establishing breeding populations for organic broccoli, sweet corn, and red kale varieties

Organic farmer interest in on-farm plant breeding has been on the rise due to a lack of available germplasm adapted to organic systems, a growing awareness of the value of regionally adapted varieties, and consolidations in the seed industry that have led to a decline in varietal offerings.

Developing “Organic-Ready” Maize Populations with Gametophytic Incompatibility Year 2

The purpose of this five-year breeding project is to reduce transgenic contamination of organic corn grown in the USA by introducing genes that do not accept pollen from other corn varieties—including genetically modified varieties--into a number of modern corn populations. Thirty-seven populations and lines are currently in the development pipeline.

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