Contact Your Senator Now On The DARK Act!

On July 23rd, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would eliminate the consumer’s right-to-know by blocking all state efforts to require labeling of genetically modified organism (GMO) foods. The “Deny Americans the Right to Know Act” or DARK Act would make voluntary labeling of GMO foods the national standard.

The labeling bill would also dilute the USDA organic certification because it does not explicitly state the certification as evidence of non-GMO, and includes no additional certification or testing requirements. Furthermore, the bill allows products to be labeled non-GMO while using GMO feed, processing aids or enzymes—despite the fact that existing USDA Organic regulations do not allow the use of GMO feed, processing aids or enzymes. 

EU Countries File to Ban GMO Crops

Nineteen of the 28 European Union member states have applied to keep genetically modified crops out of all or part of their territory. The decision is in accordance with the October 3rd deadline for opting out of the use of GM crops, already authorized as safe for cultivation, or under consideration by the EU.

The countries include Austria, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland and Slovenia. Belgium has opted to keep its French-speaking Wallonia region GMO-free as well. These EU members join Britain, who is also seeking a ban for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, leaving England the only country willingly allowing GM crop cultivation.

Organic Farming Gives Maine’s Economy a Boost

According to the 2014 Organic Survey released by the USDA in September, Maine added the most new organic farms of any state between 2008 and 2014. The state added 139 new organic farms during the time of the survey, for a total of 517, or roughly 10 percent of the 8,173 farms the USDA counted in 2012. In an economy that has faced significant challenges in recent years, this is good news. 

An article in the Bangor Daily News attributes the growth to innovative, private sector programs that connect new farmers with the experienced, help lower the cost of farmland, and make it easier for growers to get their products to large buyers.

National Organic Standards Board Seeks Board Member

The National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) was established to assist in the development of standards for substances used in organic production and to advise the Secretary on the implementation of the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (OFPA). They are seeking one person to serve on the NOSB for the remainder of the term, which began January 24, 2015 and goes through January 23, 2020.

The NOSB is looking for a person with a background in the environment or resource conservation. Among other selection criteria, candidates should have an understanding of organic principles and practical experience in the organic community.

Farmers and Advocates Gather at Farm Aid in Chicago

OFRF’s Executive Director Brise Tencer has just returned from Chicago, IL, where she attended the longest-running concert for a cause in America: Farm Aid’s 30th anniversary. The event continues what began as a one-off benefit concert in 1985, and the relevance of the message still rings clear today: we need to support justice, democracy, diversity, and sustainability in the food system. 

The gathering included pre-concert sessions on what it means to be a farm advocate, how we can continue to use grassroots organizing power to yield policy gains, and how to engage mentors to strengthen networks and achieve lasting change.